May 28

Low Tide Quilt (162)

Welcome back!  This is the last teacher quilt that I made.  This teacher had a definite color pallet and style that was easy to turn into a quilt.  My camera must have been tilted for this picture, because it looks like it is a trapezoid, but I promise I don’t make trapezoidal quilts!

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SEE!  Proof that this quilt is actually rectangular!  This was the quilt top before the basting and quilting of course.  If you notice, on the blue end, the quilt top actually was a bit longer than the final quilt.  I cut off those blue corners mostly to make it match the yellow corners (or lack thereof) on the other side of the quilt.  I had to have it look the same.

 

I named this quilt “Low Tide” because the zig-zags move onto each other like waves, and at low tide, you can find the most interesting rocks, and shells, and seaweed, and other animal life–low tide is truly magical.  So, I kind of thought about that as I looked at this quilt

 

 

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I did piece this quilt using squares on point, and while it was fun, I must be honest, when I sewed the rows together, I often found that I had sewn it wrong, so many rows had to be seam ripped and sewn all over again.  That was THE ONLY frustrating thing with this quilt.  I love everything else about this quilt.  The fabric is Cotton and Steel basics, and I love them!  I don’t know what the block is called, but I love it.

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I quilted this using my walking foot to echo the diagonal stripes.  It took a while, but I love it.

 

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I used a sweet Joel Dewberry print (left over from this teacher quilt) as the binding, and even though it wasn’t the same fabric as the quilt, it added a soft, mild, geometric border to the quilt, and I love it.

 

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The quilting really popped in the backing of this quilt, which was also not a Cotton and Steel print, but I just happened to have a few yards of coordinating fabric that worked magically as the backing to this quilt.

 

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And in case any of you were ever wondering what the back of my teacher quilts look like, it is this.  Handprints with the kids names written in them.  This quilt ended up being a nice twin sized quilt, but I’ll be honest, I didn’t measure it.  Sorry.  Blocks were made with 8 1/2 inch squares (8 inch final) with a 2 1/2 inch x 8 1/2 inch strip, and 2 1/2 inch x 10 1/2 inch strip  ( final width of 2 inches).  So, if I were to guess, I would say this quilt is about 71 inches by 92 inches.  So, large twin 🙂

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Be sure to come back on my next blog post.  It will be my 200th blog post, and I’ll be giving away some lovely fat quarter bundles.  See you then!

 

 

 

 

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May 24

Eight Pointed Star Quilt (161)

This is the “Eight Pointed Star Quilt.”

 

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I was asked by someone on Facebook the name of this block, and I did not know.  After searching the internet high and low, the closest thing that I read was that this shape is common in the Middle East and they refer to it as the “Eight Pointed Star.”

 

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I’ve made quilts using this “Eight Pointed Star” before, but with a different overall layout…

 

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Isn’t that amazing?  Same shape, completely different quilt!

 

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The inspiration for this quilt block came from this Joel Dewberry Print.    The center squares were cut to be a final 8 inches x 8 inches.  I used a flying geese method to create the points, and I love the final result.  I added some serious sashing between these blocks (4 inches final, I believe).

 

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I used this sweet Joel Dewberry print for the backing, and another brown one for the binding. The quilt pattern I used is a simple free motion meander.  The teacher that received this quilt did not realize I made it.  She thought I bought it and had the kids sign the back.  It wasn’t until another teacher told her that I made quilts that she finally understood the thought and love I put into it.  But, hey, when people think that my quilt was store purchased, that’s it’s own kind of compliment, right?

 

 

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This quilt’s final dimensions were 68 x 84.

 

But, wait!  Don’t leave yet!  I have some exciting news!  This post that you are reading right now is my 198th blog post.  That means, in two more blog posts, I will be writing #200!  This is cause for celebration.  I’m going to have some fabric giveaways from a fabulous Etsy shop, so stay tuned!  #200 is going to be a chance to win some awesome fabric!

 

Thanks for stopping by!

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May 18

Hexagon Teacher Quilt (160)

Last summer, I purchased a TON of Joel Dewberry fabric from the Dewberry home town in Northern Utah for a steal of a price.  It was my intention to use it in my teacher quilts for the next year.  Joel Dewberry fabrics have very bold designs, which sometimes can be difficult to use when piecing.  I love finding a quilt design, though, that can show off the bold fabrics in a calm way.

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You’ll notice that I cut the fabric and the border fabric in strips.  I am a fan of working less and wasting less, so I used Elizabeth Hartman’s method of creating these triangles (see her Honeycomb quilt or Honey in space quilt) only my fabric dimensions were different (background strips were cut 1 inch wide x width of fabric, printed fabric was cut 7 inches wide x width of fabric).  Once the triangles with borders were cut, I sewed the triangles together into hexagons.

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One yard of fabric made about 6 hexagons.  I sewed the hexagons into rows, and then sewed the rows together.  Sounds like a lot of work, but it was actually a fun change of pace, sewing all of those rows together.  I became a champion of the Y seams!

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I didn’t trim the edges until after quilting.  This is the final product.

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I used a nice loose free-motion meander, which was great around all of those corners!

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Hexagon quilts are not fun in the cutting, but the sewing I find rather enjoyable.  This ended up being a nice large twin sized quilt, perfect for my son’s taller teacher.

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Backed and bound by more Joel Dewberry prints.

Thanks for stopping by!

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May 10

Paisley Plus Quilt (159)

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Sometimes it’s fun just to mix things up a bit with quilts.  I saw these small multicolored print florals and paisleys and thought, “Why not?”  I love how the fabrics are made with bright flashy colors, but yet the overall quilt is rather tame as you step back.

 

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I’ve made plus quilts before, but I wanted to try this quilt using a nine-patch design where four of the blocks are half square rectangles.  This makes it so that you can take two strips of fabric of equal width and length, sew them together, and make multiple blocks by cutting them to the size you want.  In this case, I took a 2.5 inch strip of Kona Snow and sewed it with a 2.5 inch strip of colored fabric and made these lovely 4 inch (final) half-rectangle squares. The extra patterned fabric was used around the border, making the final quilt about 64.5 inches x 88.5 inches.

 

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I used a gray floral print as part of my back, along with a large swath of Kona Snow with the kids’ hand prints and names on it.  I also bound it with the same gray floral print.  Now that I’ve had a ton of practice, I have to say that I am a fan of machine binding.  I used to love hand binding, but when you have six quilts to baste, quilt, and bind in two weeks, machine binding is the way to go!

 

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In this picture, I am laying out the blocks to see if the way I organized them is visually appealing.  I also do this to check and make sure I put all the blocks in the right order.  How did we quilt without digital pictures?

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After realizing my blocks weren’t going to make a twin sized quilt, I decided to add a border.

 

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And here is the pieced top.  Thank you for stopping by!  This quilt was also well received by the teacher, who was new to the school and probably had no idea that this was something that I do.  More teacher quilts to come!

 

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May 05

College Quilts for teachers (157, 158)

Every year, I make quilts for my kids’ teachers.  This is the first time I got to make a quilt for a male teacher.  He is very outspoken about his love of his alma mater, and so I knew I needed to make him a college quilt.

 

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Since some of my kids are in immersion classes, they have two teachers.  The male teacher’s counterpart is also very proud of her alma mater, and so the two college quilts were born.

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I decided to applique the college logos instead of piecing them.  Mostly, it was because that darn “UCLA” was all in cursive, and would have been a piecing nightmare.  I was able to transfer the image from online by going into the school and utilizing their projector screen.  I traced the symbol onto the fabric, and then using fusible web, I was able to fuse these symbols onto the background quilt.  I then used a zigzag stitch to secure it to the pieced back.

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I backed each of the quilts with a strip of white fabric with their signatures on it flanked by their respective collegiate fabrics.

UCLA quilt

 

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I am happy with how these quilts turned out, and the good news is the teachers were very pleased as well!  Both of the quilts were a hit!

ucla quilt

Here are a few more pictures of the quilt tops.  The background squares are 6 inches square final.  So, these quilts are about 72 inches by 90 inches–a nice sized twin quilt.

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A close up of the quilting.  Just a standard stitch beside the ditch.  🙂  Thank you for visiting!

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